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The Gallery Aydin collection includes antique rugs, kilims and textile artifacts of different origins, and from different centuries. These historic textiles, comparable in quality to museum items, are of remarkable rarity and uniqueness, and they can be regarded as invaluable cultural heritage assets by textile art lovers, scholars, and collectors.

West Anatolia Ushak Rug

Circa 1800s Large West Anatolia Ushak Rug

A large white-ground Ushak workshop carpet produced for export. Popular in Europa and the USA ca. 1800, carpets of this kind are usually of coarse weave. Their simply drawn designs – here including a central medallion – are executed in characteristic pastel shades. – Perfect condition, good overally high pile on it. Size 19ft.5in. x 16ft.7in. (595 x 517 cm)

Middle of 19th Century North West Persia, Azerbaijan Bakhshaish Rug

Middle of 19th Century North West Persia, Azerbaijan Bakhshaish Rug

In this large and nearly square carpet from the Bakhshaish area, the stylised usual in the wide, yellow-ground border are a striking feature. The design of the field is a repeat of palmettes, rosettes, forked leaves and small tree forms, woven in pastel shades on a blue. Produced in small rural workshops, these carpets were popular in Europe and America as early as the 19th century on account of their decorative nature, and were probably woven specifically for foreign markets. – Good condition good pile; the original selvedges are preserved, no major repairs.Size 12ft.3in. x 9ft.8in. (376 x 300 cm)

South West Anatolia Milas Rug

Early 19th Century South West Anatolia Milas Rug

With its narrow field and wide, golden yellow border, this rare cypress Milas is a particularly successful example of its period in terms of artistic achievement. Stylistically it belongs to the baroque group and was made during the reign of Sultan Abdul Mejid, who was appreciative of art. A very beautiful palette; the classic border ornamentation follows the tradition of Transylvanian carpets. – The end finishes and the selvedges are original.Good high pile on it no restoration original condition.Size 100 x 160 cm

Central Asia Central Amu Darya Valley Beshir Rug

Mid 19th century Central Asia Central Amu Darya valley Beshir Rug

The carpets of the Beshir Turkmen differ greatly from the repertoire of other Turkmen tribes. Their designs and compositions, often influenced by Persian models, show no relationship with typical Turkmen gül ornamentation, and are surprising in their diversity. No other Turkmen tribe has woven designs as heterogeneous as these. To date, there has been little research into Beshir carpets, and a monograph on this interesting tribe is still outstanding. This attractive example,This large red-ground Beshir with an exemplary mina khani design and a geometric, stylised Herati border was probably made to order for a rich merchant from one of the Central Asian oasis towns for use in his home. The inner border design of halved diamonds and stepped lines on a white cotton ground is a rare feature. – Several expertly repiled sections, original finishes all around, good condition high pile.Size 210 x 335 cm

Literature:

ESKENAZI, JOHN J., L’Arte del Tappeto Orientale. Milan 1983, no. 284 *** BAUSBACK, PETER, Antike Teppiche. Sammlung Franz Bausback 1987/88. Mannheim 1987, pl. p. 194

Central Asia West Turkestan Tekke Ensi

Second half 19th century Central Asia, West Turkestan Tekke Ensi

Turkmen ensis were pile-woven door hangings used in tents. This archaic example displaying a hatchlu cross, insi kush fork devices in the four segments of the field and a mihrab at the top is a typical weaving of the Tekke tribe.Good high pile on it few small old restorations original selvedges and ends.Size 118 x 165 cm Stock no: 425

South West Anatolia Prayer Milas Rug

19th Century South West Anatolia Prayer Milas Rug

During the 19th century, Milas prayer rugs were woven in large quantities and exported to every country in the Ottoman Empire, as proven by their regular appearance in orientalist paintings. In this example, the red field is shaped like a turret, with a diamond placed at the top. The very wide, yellow-ground main border is decorated with large floral motifs. The very beautiful star borders contains a large proportion of aubergine. – Good pile original ends and selvedges nice kilim ends.Size 110 x 140 cm

South West Caucasian Fachralo Prayer Rug

Middle of 19th Century South West Caucasian Fachralo Rug

A classic red-ground prayer rug of the Fachralo group. The green mihrab field contains a large cartouche. The clear colours and spaciously conceived design make this a beautiful collector’s item. Size 155 x 179 cm

Central Anatolian Mudjur Prayer Rug

19th Century Central Anatolia Mujur Prayer Rug

Niche design Mujur carpets were highly popular during the 19th century, selling to all the regions of the Islamic world. They are often very realistically portrayed in genre paintings by Western orientalist painters depicting scenes from North African bazaars. Early examples such as this red-ground Mujur display a widely conceived mihrab form and stand out due to their balanced compositions and rich range of brilliant colours. The field and border motifs were rigidly fixed by tradition, but there was a certain latitude in the design of the field. This piece shows a striking tree motif which dominates the centre of the field; linked to its tip by fine lines, it is effectively suspended from it.Very good overall condition and strong unfaded colours,Good high pile on it.Size 135 x 180 cm 

Literature:
CONCARO, EDOARDO & LEVI, ALBERTO, Sovrani Tappeti. Il tappeto orientale dal XV al XIX seculo. Milan 1999, no. 36
THOMPSON, JON, Carpet Magic. The art of carpets from the tents, cottages and workshops of Asia. London 1983, pl. p. 4 *** TKF-WIEN (publ.), Antike anatolische Teppiche aus österreichischem Besitz. Vienna 1983, no. 49 *** BUTTERWECK, GEORG & ORASCH, DIETER

West Anatolia Transylvanian Double Niche Rug

West Anatolia, 17th century Transylvanian Double Niche Rug
Standing in a direct line of descent from the 'small-medallion' or 'double-niche' Ushak rugs of the 16th century, these double-niche 'Transylvanian' rugs were woven during the 17th century in western Anatolia for the European export market. They are not especially rare, but few if any can match this superb cartouche-bordered rug, in near perfect condition, which was bought at Rippon Boswell in 1997 (HALI 94, p. 132), having previously been offered at Sotheby's in New York in 1992.
Only double-niche rugs of this designs' symmetrical on the vertical axis and with the characteristic cartouche border and four rosettes at the corners of the field“ were (together with the related prayer rugs) granted the 'Transylvanian' label in Emil Schmutzler's 1933 classification of the rugs that survived in the churches of the region (Emil Schmutzler, Altorientalische Teppiche in Siebenbürgen, 1933).
More recently, Stefano Ionescu (Antique Ottoman Rugs in Transylvania, 2005), has divided the rugs found in Romanian churches and museums into four different design groups, the numerically largest being those with variations on the double-niche design.
Conventional wisdom has it that rugs such as this 'second phase' example, with the cartouche-only border, post-date those with the more elaborate eight-pointed star and cartouche variant. Irrespective of whether it was made in the first or second half of the century, one rarely sees a Transylvanian rug in such pristine condition at auction.
The texture of the pile and its fresh bright colours remain almost as they were when it came off the loom. Even the edges are intact. Such a rug, which has been kept away from light and wear for more than three centuries, is a rare document showing us how it looked when it was woven.Condition: very good according to age, corroded brown, both ends slightly incomplete, original selvedge but slightly damaged at right side, minor small repairs, very good pile
Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

Size 158 x 120 cm (5' 2" x 3' 11")

WEST ANATOLIAN 'GHIRLANDAIO' RUG

 LATE 17TH CENTURY WEST ANATOLIAN 'GHIRLANDAIO' RUG
Minor light localised wear, a repaired tear and reweave to one side, a few minute cobbled repairs otherwise very good condition Size 141 x 210 cm 6ft.11in. x 4ft.8in.including the kilim ends.

SOLD

South West Caucasian Karachov Kazak

Middle of 19th Century South West Caucasian Karachov Kazak

In this red-ground Karachov Kazak, a large green shield form decorated with five, alternately yellow and white boxes fills the entire length of the field, flanked by pairs of triangles along the sides. The border displays the kochak hook designs that are typical of the provenance on a heavily corroded brown ground. – Signs of age and wear,good pile,the original selvedges and ends.Size 158 x 208 cm

Literature:
HERRMANN, EBERHART, Asiatische Teppich- und Textilkunst 4. Munich 1992, no. 39 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 27, 7th May 1988, lot 57 *** BAUSBACK, PETER, Alte und antike orientalische Knüpfkunst. Mannheim 1981, pl. p. 27

North West Anatolia Marmara region Çanakkale Niche Kilim

Early 18th Century North West Anatolia Marmara region Çanakkale Niche Kilim

Kilims showing double niche designs were woven in many Anatolian regions, but there are significant differences in terms of style, palette and the use of individual designs specific to particular locations. This two-panel Canakkale kilim displays six plain green-, red- or aubergine-ground panels containing double niches. Their arches are decorated with parmakli designs extending far into the white-ground sections at the sides. Two facing fork shapes attached to thin long poles – stylised oil lamps – are the only motifs seen in the niches. The six panels are separated by sets of three horizontal stripes. The fork shapes of the inner stripes may represent abstract birds. – Always cautious when determining age, Hirsch assumes a mid 18th century date. Judging from the quality of the drawing and colours, we believe that the kilim could have been made ca. 1700s or earlier. A fragmented kilim of the same group was exhibited in Basel in 1997. Two examples published by Cootner and Wolff-Diepenbrock belong to the same group. – Obvious signs of age and wear, missing sections; the side finishes have largely been lost. Mounted onto canvas.Size 145 x 440 cm

Literature:
RAGETH, JÜRG (Hrsg.), Anatolian Kilims & Radiocarbon Dating. A New Approach to Dating Anatolian Kilims. (Ausstell. Kantonsmuseum Baselland, Liestal) Riehen 1999, Tf. 19 *** COOTNER, CATHRYN & MUSE, GARRY, Anatolian Kilims. The Caroline & H. McCoy Jones Collection. San Francisco-London 1990, Tf. 15 *** WOLFF-DIEPENBROCK, JOHANNES (Hrsg.), Eine Sammlung. Textilien aus Anatolien, dem Kaukasus, Persien, Mittelasien, Zentral- und Ostafrika. Köln 2009, Tf. S. 77

Published:
VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims und andere Flachgewebe aus Anatolien. (Text: Udo Hirsch) München 1997, Nr. 24

 

Central Asia, West Turkestan The Tekke Khalyk

Second half of 19th century Central Asia, West Turkestan The Tekke Khalyk

Known as khalyks, most of the surviving small-format knotted trappings of this kind were woven by the Tekke tribe. Almost all them are red in ground colour. Common features shared by all khalyks are their U-shape including vertical arms, a lower triangular flap and a fringe, originally present in every example. They differ widely in terms of ornamentation. – During the wedding procession, a khalyk was attached to the small door of the veiled bridal litter and apparently not used once the ceremony was over, but preserved by the family as a textile treasure. The number of surviving khalyks is low; some 70 examples are known. The rarity and beauty of khalyks as well as their appreciation as cult objects of highly symbolic significance among the Turkmen, have made these miniature rugs coveted collector’s pieces. – It is one of the rare with thisa design examples this khalyk appears like a miniature version of a kapunuk.Very well preserved, original sides all around; the fringe is almost complete.Size 70 x 70 cm

South Caucasian Chondzoresk Dated Rug

1855 Dated South Caucasian Chondzoresk Rug

This red-ground Chondzoresk displays three octagonal medallions in green and dark blue, each containing eight snake motifs arranged concentrically around a box shape. The spaces not covered by the main design are filled with stars, stepped polygons, diamonds and tiny scattered motifs. Frequently encountered in the Baku region, the design of the main border – dragon figures stylised to S-forms – is rare in Chondzoresk carpets. – Slight signs of wear in the pile, minor restored areas, good overall condition.Dated 1271 = 1855 Size 138 x 280 cm

 

South West Caucasian Fachrola Kazak

Middle of 19th Century South West Caucasian Fachrola Kazak

This green-ground Fachralo has two red medallions placed along the central axis and four octagons arranged around them, framed by a wide border. The square format is an unusual feature. Original red kilim ends and selvedges, good overall condition high pile on it.Size 105 x 134 cm

Literature:
AMPE, PATRICK & RIE, Textile Art. A personal choice. Antwerp 1994, no. 42 *** TSCHEBULL, RAOUL, Kazak. Carpets of the Caucasus. New York 1971, pl. 9

South West Anatolia Mugla Rug

Second Half 19th Century South West Anatolia, Mugla province

In this Megri, a deep green double niche decorated with four large blossoms takes up almost the whole of the narrow field. The lower arch is straight-sided while the upper one has stepped sides. The yellow spandrels contain red triangular forms enclosing arrow motifs. The border design – three bands in green, golden yellow and white – is typical of the provenance. Brilliant colours. – Slight signs of wear in the pile, good overall condition, original finishes all around.Size 92 x 148 cm 

Literature:
YOHE, RALPH S. & McCOY JONES, H., Turkish Rugs. Washington, D.C. 1968, Nr.56 *** BAUSBACK, PETER, Anatolische Knüpfteppiche aus vier Jahrhunderten. Mannheim 1978, Tf. S.109

South West Caucasian Rug

Middle of 19th Century South West Caucasian Rug

The date on this extraordinary long carpet is not clearly legible. Its independent design and the good colours,unusual blue ground with this design however, suggest an early origin. Even pile with original edges and ends.Good pile on it.Size 115 x 285 cm

South West Caucasian Bordjalo Carpet

Late 19th Century South West Caucasian Bordjalo  Rug

The rare design of this large red-ground Kazak shows typical devices of the Bordjalou and Fachralo groups in a combination seldom encountered.This carpet also features two massive medallions in the central field, a motif known from Fachralo carpets. The rug is thus a reference piece proving that in addition to the commonly known groups, further sub-groups existed in Caucasian weaving, with little information currently available on their exact provenances.A characteristic feature of Bordjalou rugs is the black-brown-white reciprocal latch hook border. – Original finishes all around high pile on it.Size 115 x 176 cm 

North West Anatolia Feshane Quran Bag Design Silk Rug

Late 19th Century North West Anatolia Feshane Quran Bag Design Silk Rug 

Hereke workshops, which later specialised in the production of ultra-fine silk rugs, initially wove a great variety of designs and formats. This rare piece emulates a Feshane carpet with three eight-pointed star medallions. Like those of Tabriz and other Persian towns, the workshops of Hereke would only have seen illustrations of their historic models. Large-format, printed graphic reproductions only became available after publication of the "Vienna Work", which accompanied the Great Vienna Exhibition, i.e. not before the last decade of the 19th century. – Signs of age and wear, somewhat damaged sides and ends.Size 125 x 185 cm Silk on Silk.

South West Caucasian Sevan Carpet

 Second half 19th century South West Caucasian Sevan Carpet

This red-ground Sevan Kazak displays a huge “winged shield” medallion, its interior covered in small dots. The red cartouche at the centre encloses a smaller white cartouche. The wide white outline is adorned with stars, while large palmettes on a yellow ground constitute the design of the main border. An almost identical example was exhibited in London in 1983. – Good high pile on it original selvedges.

Literature:
THOMPSON, JON, Carpet Magic. The art of carpets from the tents, cottages and workshops of Asia. London 1983, pl. p. 115

SOLD

Central Asia South West Uzbekistan Bokhara Suzani

Mid 19th century Central Asia, South West Uzbekistan Bokhara Suzani

A Bokhara suzani in the nim format. The field displays a repeat of delicate golden stems bearing red side-view flowers, slender green leaves and several botehs. As is often the case in small-format suzani, the border consists of just one panel; in this item, it contains three different types of large blossom in top view or side view, surrounded by a lively undulating vine. Small circular and star-shaped blossoms as well as several irises have been incorporated into the design of the border. – Good condition, the back is a Russian cotton. Size 104 x 160 cm 

 

South West Caucasian Lambalo Kazak

19th Century South West Caucasian Lambalo Kazak

A classic specimen from the Lambalo region, with an extremely large border frame enclosing a diamond patterned central field.The characteristic border design, consisting of four panels of equal width, and the vine design including octagonal flowers that appear like balls identify this rug as a Lambalo Kazak. The red field is dominated by a hexagon with a hooked outline that encloses a cross motif. The same design is frequently seen in Fachralo Kazaks. – Original finishes all around good high pile.Size 155 x 225 cm 

East Caucasian Large Shirvan Rug

19th Century East Caucasian Large Shirvan Rug

This unusual large size Shirvan Five large hexagons with wide outlines of dice are aligned vertically along the central axis of the midnight blue field, ending in a red flame palmette at each end. A wealth of small designs, including amulets  densely covers the ground in the free spaces not covered by the primary design. The white main border presents the leaf and calyx design that is typical of the provenance. – Good high pile, the original finishes survive all around.Size 200 x 355 cm 

Central Asia West Turkestan Salor Main Carpet

Central Asia West Turkestan Salor Main Carpet

West Turkestan late 18th century, asymmetrical knot open to the left in dense warp layering, H 50, V 55 = 2,750 kts/sqm. The Salor tribes with their carpets represent the aristocracy of Turkmen tribes. They used a high proportion of luxurious materials, such as silk and insect-derived dyes. Their products are especially rare, and so far only 37 complete central carpets from this group have been published. This finely knotted red piece is also wider than usual with 6 horizontal gülli-gül rows, in contrast to the more common five-row central carpets. A comparable specimen in the same size and with the same number of güls can be found only in Jourdan’s Battenberg catalogue. In contrast to smaller knotted pieces, a high proportion of silk has been used here, which is rather rare in large-format carpets. This piece is in good pile condition for its age, with a few low areas. A few sewn tears and repairs as well as two large repairs to the right outer long side. At both ends, the former kilim ends are no longer preserved and the narrow outer borders are trimmed short. Edge damage.Size 270 x 324  cm

Literature:

Elena Tsareva, Turkmen Carpets, Masterpieces of Steppe Art, from 16th to 19th Centuries,the Hoffmeister Collection, ill. 1; Jürg Rageth, Turkmen carpets, a new approach, vols I and II, cat. nos 16, 17; Elena Tsareva, Turkmen Carpets, the Neville Kingston collection, ill. pp. 26 and 27; Robert Pinner and Murray L. Eiland Jr., Between the Black Desert and the Red, Turkmen Carpets from the Wiedersperg Collection, plate 1; Catalogue of the exhibition “Wie Blumen in der Wüste”, on the occasion of the 7th International Conference on Oriental Carpets (ICOC), Museum für Völkerkunde, Hamburg, pl. 96; Uwe Jourdan, Battenberg antiques catalogue, Turkmen carpets, ill. 1; Werner Loges, Turkmen carpets, pl. 17

South West Anatolia Dazkırı Kilim

First Half 19th Century South West Anatolia Dazkırı Kilim

This rare kilim from the Dazkiri region is woven without vertical borders, and only has two narrow border finishes at the ends. The dark brown field contains two complete hexagons with hooked outlines and a further one cut by the border. Linked to one another, each of the huge motifs encloses a central hooked diamond surrounded by concentric rings of serrated devices in brilliant and diverse colours. – Minor rewoven areas, good overall condition.Size 161 x 245 cm

SOLD

South East Caucasian Talish Rug

Second half 19th century South East Caucasian Talish Rug

A first-rate carpet with a deep blue met hane field, separated from the border by a golden yellow, reciprocal trefoil band of exemplary drawing. Previously published by Eder, this weaving is notable as the talish rosettes seen in the border are interspersed with six squares, and as many as nine squares at the top, whereas only four squares occur in other pieces. Very good condition, minimally reduced ends.Size 103 x 237 cm 3ft. 5in.7ft. 9in.

Literature:
EILAND, MURRAY L., Oriental Rugs from Pacific Collections. San Francisco 1990, no. 214 b *** DODDS, DENNIS & EILAND, MURRAY L., JR. (eds.), Oriental Rugs from Atlantic Collections. Philadelphia 1996, no. 77

South Caucasus, Karabagh region Adler Rug

Second Half 19th Century South Caucasus, Karabagh region Adler Rug

Three powerful sunburst medallions, separated along the centre by a narrow serrated horizontal band, almost completely fill the light red field. Coarsely woven and with wefts alternating between red and brown, this „Eagle Kazak“ was made in the Karabagh region. It formerly belonged to the Collection. The original selvedges,slightly reduced ends. It's in perfect overall condition good high pile on it.Size 150 x 210 cm

Ottoman Kilim

18th Century West Anatolia, Manisa province Ottoman Kilim

This wonderful kilim was first published by Yanni Petsopoulos in "Kilims, 1979". It belongs to a small group of weavings that form a bridge between the Ottoman court tent kilim and nomadic and village flatweaves. They are more colourful than the Ottoman kilims but use their motifs. Unlike the nomadic pieces they are woven in one piece.
The group can be divided into two subgroups. One has a field surrounded by borders and is usually wider; the other, like our example, is organised in bands and is narrower. Both are woven in wool on wool and are not especially fine, but the first group is looser than the second. Following the six examples published in Kilims, another piece appeared in Werner Brüggemann, "Yayla, 1993", plate 33.
The motifs of the blue and red strips are shown as outer-end borders in a piece at the Vakiflar museum in Istanbul (Belkis Balpinar/Udo Hirsch, Flatweaves, 1982, plate 120). In this kilim the main border shows the same pattern as the dividing strips in our piece.
Petsopoulos notes that this piece is probably the oldest of the second group. The flowers of the blue and red strips travel upwards, except the uppermost one, and are all connected by the centre stem. It has been suggested that therefore the kilim should be viewed horizontally and might have used as a tent divider or hanging in a house.
A comparable example was in the Vok collection (Ignazio Vok, Anatolia, 1997, No. 1), and is less colourful but with a wider range of motifs in the strips. As in our piece it showed the peculiar 'dot' filling of the background, which gives the design a certain three-dimensional quality.
A prayer kilim in the Berlin Museum (Friedrich Spuhler, Die Orientteppiche im Museum für islamische Kunst Berlin, 1991, p. 290) shows the same ‘dot’ feature and more clearly defined tulip and carnation motifs. The outer minor border is the same as the 'odd one out' strip at the bottom of our kilim.
The designs of these kilim group go back to the Ottoman court kilim. They can also in part be found in Kula and Gördes rugs; this, as well as the colour range, makes an attribution to western Anatolia likely. Our piece here has light blue warps, a feature that can be found in some of the pile weavings as well.
A faint reminiscence of the carnation and tulip strip design can be found in a later kilim published in Ulrich Türck/Dietmar Pelz, "Anatolische Kelim in Schloß Lembeck, 1995", Pl. 12.

Rather coarse in weave, soft in texture and executed in attractive pastel shades, this kilim is the product of a specialised West Anatolian workshop, possibly Kula or Selendi. Both towns were important textile centres during the Ottoman period. The design of wide bands, alternately decorated with floral or geometric motifs in the Ottoman court style, is a characteristic feature of this distinctive group. The directional tree design seen in some of the bands suggests that the kilims served as wall hangings, i.e. tapestries, and were suspended horizontally. They may have been used in the magnificent tents which accommodated Ottoman pashas during their frequent military campaigns. Both shorter and wider than comparative pieces, the Vok example was exhibited in Dublin as early as 1979. – Minimal signs of age and wear, good condition.Size 292 x 152 cm (9' 7" x 5')

South East Caucasus, Moghan region Shahsavan Rug

South East Caucasus, Moghan Region Shahsavan Rug 

This knotted rug by the Shahsavan of the Moghan region displays a very rare design of geometric stylised palmettes, each enclosing an “S”-figure. The palmettes are arranged into steep colour diagonals and stand out very clearly from the earth brown, partially corroded ground. The angular drawing style of the motifs indicates that the design derives from kilim models. – Some of the brown sections have been repiled; good condition.Dated 1279 AH = 1863 Size 120 x 205 cm

South East Caucasus, Moghan region Shahsavan Horse Cover

Late 19th Century South East Caucasus, Moghan region Shahsavan Horse Cover

Woven in a single piece, this horse cover shows six wide horizontal bands separated by narrow borders in the lower section. Three bands depict animals moving from right to left – peacocks in the two blue bands and quadrupeds in the central red band. The three other bands contain typical Shahsavan border designs. The upper part, with the tabs which were placed around the horse’s neck, is far more open in design: two blue compartments separated by a design section of red and green serrated bands each contain a further six animals. The same serrated design, this time in blue and red, adorns the tabs. – Very well preserved.Size 118 x 167 cm

South Caucasian Azerbaijan Sumac

Second Half 19th Century South Caucasian, Azerbaijan Sumac

Our attribution of this sumakh bag face is guided by Wertime who published an almost identical example. A further bag of this rare group is encountered in Frauenknecht's book, "Schahsavan Sumakh Taschen". Since various nomad tribes inhabited the Karabagh region during the 19th century, it is impossible to ascertain the precise group who made these bags. – Well preserved, the kilim back stitched to the reverse belongs to a different bag.Size 60 x 60 cm

Literature:
WERTIME, JOHN T., Sumak Bags of Northwest Persia & Transcaucasia. London 1998, no. 126 *** FRAUENKNECHT, BERTRAM, Schahsavan Sumakh Taschen. Fürth 1993, ill. 49

South West Caucasian Sevan Kazak

Mid 19th Century South West Caucasian Sevan Kazak

 An early Sevan Kazak woven in light, transparent colours. The huge two-dimensional shield medallion fills the field almost completely. The dot design of the medallion and the stylised trees outside the medallion are typical features of this sub-group. – Slight signs of wear in the pile of the upper section of the field, otherwise in good condition, including the original selvedges.Size 172 x 232 cm

Literature:
THOMPSON, JON, Carpet Magic. The art of carpets from the tents, cottages and workshops of Asia. London 1983, pl. p. 115 *** KIRCHHEIM, E. HEINRICH, Orient Stars. Eine Teppichsammlung. Stuttgart & London 1993, no. 14

Central Asia Karadashli Main Carpet

First half 19th century Central Asia, West Turkestan Karadashli Main Carpet

The 33 large chuval güls of the red-brown field are spaciously arranged in rows of three and interspersed with delicately drawn chemche secondary güls. The white main border shows different designs in the vertical and horizontal bands – in the vertical direction, a Turkmen wavy vine undulates around curled leaves to which it is not attached, while ashik güls alternate with calyx-like shapes in the horizontal direction. Both secondary borders are embellished with small polygons. The fact that the outer secondary border continues beyond the border section, framing the sides of the two wide elems decorated with graceful trees, is a striking feature. – Signs of age and wear, low pile, minor restored areas very few.Size 175 x 303 cm

Literature:
RAGETH, JÜRG, Turkmenische Teppiche. Basel 2016, vol. 1, no. 87

 

South East Caucasian, Azerbaijan Baku Zili Shaddas

South East Caucasian, Azerbaijan Baku Zili Shaddas

Middle of 19th Century South East Caucasian, Azerbaijan Baku Zili Shaddas Formerly described as animal vernehs or a shaddas (the Persian word for "cover"), Caucasian flatweaves of this kind are now called zilis on account of their weaving technique. The design is finely woven in the sumakh technique on an alternately inky blue or brick red foundation. These systematic changes in colour are a common feature shared by such zilis. Narrow white borders surround the compartments and panels which contain large peacock-like birds, smaller birds and flowering trees with mighty crowns. The seemingly mythological designs are drawn in the characteristic, geometric Caucasian style. These decorative covers were produced by the Tat, a tribe who lived on the Absheron Peninsula in the Baku region. – Very good condition.Size 148 x 194 cm Literature: THOMPSON, jon, Carpet Magic. London 1983, p. 98 *** kerimow, ljatif, et al., Kaukasische Teppiche. Leningrad 1984, no. 2 *** wright, richard & wertime, john, Caucasian Carpets & Covers. London 1995, pl. vii *** neugebauer, rudolf & orendi, julius, Orientalische Teppichkunde. Leipzig 1909, pl. 73 *** landreau, anthony n. & pickering, w. r., From the Bosporus to Samarkand. Flat-Woven Rugs. Washington, d.c. 1969, ill. p. 95 *** vok, ignazio, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. Munich 1996, no. 25

Caucasian Moghan Rug

Caucasian Moghan Rug

19th Century 
130 × 236 cm


Middle of 19th Century South East Caucasian Moghan Rug.The striking, hooked stepped polygon filling each of the 24 compartments in the two-row composition of this Moghan is known as a Memling gül. It owes its name to a small-format rug depicted as a tablecloth by Hans Memling in a painting dated circa 1485 (now in the Thyssen Museum, Madrid), and is considered one of the oldest rug designs. The Memling gül appears to have made its way from Anatolia to the Caucasus, where it became wide-spread and is found in carpets from various provenances, although it is particularly frequent in the Moghan region. – The captivating effect of this Moghan derives from its splendid colours. The weaver has dreamed up ever new colour combinations for the güls, their outlines, the stars they enclose and the ground colours of the octagons in which the güls are placed: each of the 24 compartments is different. The stepped polygon design of the main border is a rare feature. – Very good condition.Size 130 x 236 cm

Caucasian Moghan Mafrash

Caucasian Moghan Mafrash

19th Century

Size 40 x 112 cm

Second half 19th century South East Caucasus, Moghan region Called "mafrash", these large flatweaves with four sides and a kilim base were used by the Shahsavan nomads like containers for storing utensils, and they also served as cargo bags during the annual migrations to the summer pastures. Old photographs show camels carrying tall loads of mafrash containers. Mafrash lacking upper closure flaps, like this finely woven example in the sumakh technique, are usually attributed to the Moghan Shahsavan. The design of horizontal stripes, with a deep blue central band containing large hooked diamonds and two narrower white bands, has been conceived to continue along all four panels. – Very well preserved.Size 40 x 112 cm Literature: TANAVOLI, parviz, Shahsavan. Flachgewebe aus dem Iran. Herford 1985, no. 46 *** azadi, siawosch & andrews, peter, Mafrash. Gewebte Transporttaschen als textile Bilder des Orients-Arbeiten der Schahsavan und anderer Stämme Persiens. Berlin-Munich 1985, ill. p. 109

South West Caucasian Sevan Kazak

South West Caucasian Sevan Kazak

This Second half 19th century red-ground Sevan Kazak displays a huge “winged shield” medallion, its interior covered in small dots. The red cartouche at the centre encloses a smaller white cartouche. The wide white outline is adorned with stars, while large palmettes on a white ground constitute the design of the main border. An almost identical example was exhibited in London in 1983.Perfect condition very good high pile.Size 185 x 235 cm

East Caucasus Kuba region Zeichur Rug

19th Century East Caucasus, Kuba region Zeichur Rug
The dense floral repeat seen in the field, executed in muted colours on a green ground, derives from French fabric designs and is only encountered in this form in Zeikhur rugs. Unlike the Georgian wavy vine border, the field design constitutes a deliberate departure from Caucasian traditions. Zeikhur rugs of this kind were commissioned by Russian officials or military officers living in the conquered province of Azerbaijan. They were also exported to the Czarist Empire where a fashion for Caucasian carpets soon emerged. – Well preserved,  original finishes all around.Very good high pile Size 97 x 303 cm Stock No 1479

 

East Caucasian Shirvan Prayer Rug

19th Century East Caucasian Shirvan Prayer Rug

in this gorgeous white-ground Shirvan prayer rug, a blue hexagonal lattice design placed beneath a bridge-shaped prayer arch encloses large, perfectly drawn palmettes in different colour combinations. The very fine weave, confidently proportioned design and brilliant colours are indications of an early date.Perfect condition some silk pile on it.Size 107 × 159 cm

Literature:
GANS-RUEDIN, ERWIN, Orientteppiche des 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhunderts. Munich 1975, pl. p. 183

 

Caucasian Talish Rug

 South East Caucasus, Moghan region Talish Rug 

Second half 19th Century South East Caucasus, Moghan region Talish Rug A rare Moghan woven in a long rug format. The white met hane field is surrounded by green trefoils which combine into reciprocal shapes against the ground. The red border contains large star-shaped flowers with four diagonal arms bearing buds. – Perfect condition,Very good high pile,untouched.Size 95 × 310 cm Stock No 1442

Literature:
BAUSBACK, PETER, Alte und antike orientalische Knüpfkunst. Mannheim 1983, pl. p. 55

 

 
Transylvanian Double Niche Carpet

17th Century Transylvanian Rug

Carpets of this kind were produced in weaving centres in the West Anatolian province of Manisa, chiefly for export to Europe. The largest number of them has survived in the Protestant churches of Transylvania, resulting in the whole group being summarily described as “Transylvanian” rugs. Part of the Kingdom of Hungary, the principality was situated at one of the interfaces of the Islamic and Christian worlds at the time, and local merchants played an important role in the transit trade with the Ottoman Empire.This rare beautiful white -ground example displays a double niche design, a apricot diamond-shaped central medallion decorated with white rosettes along its sides and a yellow-ground main border of large cartouches;The original finishes have survived all around; very few old repiled sections and repairs good pile Size 107 x 145 cm

SOLD

Central Asia West Turkestan Tekke Main Carpet

First Half 19th Century Central Asia, West Turkestan Tekke Main Carpet

A large main carpet by the Tekke tribe with 4 x 11 primary güls, chemche secondary motifs, a densely patterned border and pile-woven elems of tree forms aligned in a row. The fairly coarse weave, heavy and flexible handle, velvety pile wool and rich luminous colours indicate that this main carpet was probably woven in the first half of the 19th century.Several old repiled sections, signs of age and wear but good pile on it.Size 205 x 310 cm Stock No 1068

Literature:SCHÜRMANN, ULRICH, Zentral-Asiatische Teppiche. Frankfurt a.M. 1969, no. 1 *** HAMBURGISCHES MUSEUM FÜR VÖLKERKUNDE (publ.), Wie Blumen in der Wüste. Die Kultur der turkmenischen Nomadenstämme Zentralasiens. Hamburg 1993, no. 20

Shirvan Marasali Rug

East Caucasus, Shirvan Marasali Prayer Rug
19th Century Brilliantly coloured botehs of diverging interior design with deeply serrated outlines form a dense repeat of offset rows in the midnight blue field; a wide prayer arch has been incorporated into the design at the upper end. The white-ground main border of abstract birds is flanked by secondary borders of small star-shaped blossoms attached to a red vine. The characteristic shape of the botehs, the fine weave and silk wefts indicate that this Shirvan prayer rug belongs to the Marasali group. – Signs of age and wear. Both sides and both ends rewoven, uniformly low pile.Size 115 x 155 cm

Literature:
BAUSBACK, PETER, Antike Orientteppiche. Brunswick 1978, pl. p. 239 *** FOKKER, NICOLAS, Caucasian Rugs of Yesterday. London, Boston & Sydney 1979, pl. p. 107

SOLD

 
South West Caucasian Bordjalo Rug

Late 18th Century South West Caucasian Bordjalo Rug

This Best early Kazak of the Borjalou group shows a design of harmonious proportions woven in mellow colours, with a degree of patination that suggests great age. As in empty-compartment Kazaks, the field is divided into two red and one central green compartments which are surrounded on all sides by the inner secondary border. Outlined in reciprocal trefoils, the compartments are empty spaces except for a small comb motif placed in the green centre. These are further common features shared with three-compartment Kazaks. The two groups are obviously closely related. On the other hand, the wide border of halved hooked diamonds, with a white, band-like hooked vine zigzagging between them, is a characteristic feature of Borjalou Kazaks. – Signs of wear in the pile, good pile somewhat reduced ends, original selvedges.Size 165 x 185 cm

SOLD

Kayseri Silk Rug

Kayseri Silk Rug

19th Century 
335 × 480 cm
SOLD

Kumkapı Silk Rug

İSTANBUL Koum Kapı Silk Rug

19th Century 
125 × 182 cm
SOLD

Sevan Rug

Caucasian Sevan Rug

19th Century 
215 × 260 cm
Stock No

South Caucasian Azerbaijan Fragment Rug

18th Century South Caucasian Azerbaijan Fragment Rug

A massive design bar of five large rectangles with serrated outlines lies on the central axis of the earth-brown field, flanked by huge pairs of sickle leaves on both sides. The ground is covered in Talish rosettes and a variety of blossoms. The unusually narrow border shows double hooks lined up in a row. This rare rug was probably woven in the Karabagh region. A distinctly older example of this rare group used to be in the "Orient Stars" Collection Size 118 x 161 cm

SOLD

 
Ottoman Embroidery

Ottoman Embroidery

17th Century 
112 × 123 cm
Stock No

Anatolian Bergama Rug

Anatolian Bergama Rug 

19th Century 
175 × 220 cm
SOLD

 
Caucasian Star Kazak Rug

Caucasian Star Kazak Rug

18th Century 
170 × 230 cm
SOLD

Pinwheel Kazak

South West Caucasian Pinwheel Kazak

The village population of Transcaucasia upheld their traditional rug designs with great persistence. This continuity only ended with the social upheaval caused by the Russian Revolution. So-called "Pinwheel" Kazaks woven in a distinctive design – the eponymous, steel blue forms decorated with spirals to suggest a rotary movement, diagonal green abstract dragons studded with yellow crescents and white rosettes – were produced throughout the 19th century and in the early 20th century, although their quality steadily declined. Nonetheless, only a very few examples were known until circa 1980 so this Kazak type was considered particularly rare. The fact that the size of this rug group is actually far larger only became evident when the Soviet Union ceased to exist and the borders opened. – A comparison of the many examples now published reveals considerable aesthetic differences in the division of space, balance of designs, palette, knotting structure and pile wool used. This Pinwheel Kazak is a perfect classic example. The quality of the brilliant colours and the balanced composition suggest that it was produced around 1850. – Very good condition, the original finishes survive all around.Size 180 x 240 cm

Literature:
McMULLAN, JOSEPH V., Islamic Carpets. New York 1965, Nr. 53 *** KIRCHHEIM, E. HEINRICH, Orient Stars. Eine Teppichsammlung. Stuttgart & London 1993, Nr. 16 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 27, 07.05.1988, #116; A 43, 18.11.1995, #137 *** SPUHLER, FRIEDRICH, Die Orientteppiche im Museum für Islamische Kunst Berlin. München 1987, Nr. 108 *** HERRMANN, EBERHART, Asiatische Teppich- und Textilkunst 3. München 1991, Nr. 17

SOLD

Suzani Kermina

Kermina Suzani
19th century 1st half
Silk and cotton embroidery
175 × 215 cm
SOLD

Mongolian Kilim

Chinese Mongolian Kilim

19th Century 
155 × 225 cm
Stock No

Nord-West Rug

Persian Nord-West Rug
19th century 
107 × 184 cm

Stock No 582

Konya Karapınar Rug

Konya Karapınar Rug
19th century 
101 × 155 cm

Stock No 612

Qashqai Bag

Persian Qashqai Bag
19th century 
44× 53 cm

Stock No 1242

Ushak Fragment

Ushak Border Fragment
16th century 
58 × 110 cm

Stock No 409

Kuba Shirvan Rug

Kuba Shirvan Rug
19th century 
90 × 295 cm

Stock No

Lotto Rug

Lotto Rug
17th century 
117 × 169 cm

SOLD

Star Ushak Rug

Star Ushak Rug
17th century A Star Ushak with two complete medallions placed along the central axis, six further medallions cut by the border area placed along the sides in an offset arrangement, and smaller diamonds linked horizontally to the stars. Conceived by Ottoman court artists as an endless repeat, the ornamentation of this design goes back to Persian models dating from the Kara Koyunlu dynasty. The primary ornament, an eight-pointed star with a complex interior drawing of yellow vines, leaves and blossoms, is seen in its fully developed form on the decorative tiles of the Blue Mosque, Tabriz (1465). Star Ushaks were popular in the Ottoman Empire for a long period. Judging by their comparatively frequent appearance in European paintings, Star Ushaks must have been exported in large numbers. – Research to date concludes that Star Ushaks were made around 1470 to 1630. Rarer than Medallion Ushaks, which are closely related in overall concept, knotting structure and palette, but probably an older type, they are some of the most sought after collector’s carpets from the heyday of the Ottoman Empire.The inner border is striking for its rare design of small, eight-pointed stars. Finely woven in first rate colours, this carpet is datable ca. 1600.Perfect condition very good pile Size 185 x 306 cm
SOLD

Chintamani

Selendi Chintamani Prayer Rug
17th century 
115 × 168 cm

SOLD

 

Yamud Chuval

Turkmen Yamud Chuval

18th Century 
63 × 104 cm
Stock No

Persian Qashqai Rug

Persian Qashqai Rug

19th Century 
152 × 238 cm
Stock No

Anatolian Melas Rug

Anatolian Melas Rug 

19th Century 
110 × 160 cm
Stock No

Talish Rug

Caucasian Talish Rug

19th Century 
100× 315 cm
Stock No

Turkish Silk Rug

Turkey İstanbul Silk Rug

19th Century 
123× 190 cm
Stock No

Bordjalo Rug

Caucasian Bordjalo Rug

19th Century 
185 × 225 cm
SOLD

Marasali Rug

Shirvan Marasali Rug
19th Century 

128 × 157 cm
SOLD

Karabag Rug

Caucasian Karabag Rug

19th Century 
250 × 610 cm
Stock No

Caucasian Karacof Rug

Caucasian Karatcof Rug

19th Century 
180 × 215 cm
SOLD

Adler Rug

Caucasian Adler Rug

19th Century 
150 × 220 cm
SOLD

Transylvanian Double Niche Rug

Transylvanian Rug

17th Century 
120 × 188 cm
SOLD

Kuba Rug

Shirvan Kuba Rug

19th Century 
110 × 152 cm
Stock No

Karapınar Rug

Central Anatolian Karapınar Rug 

17th Century 
135 × 220 cm
SOLD

West Anatolian Bergama Rug

17th Century North West Anatolia Bergama Rug 

The knotting structure, palette, style of drawing and several ornamental details suggest that this very rare small-format rug was woven in West Anatolia. Compositions restricted to two large forms are some of the oldest known Anatolian design layouts. In this item, two huge azure star devices with yellow stepped outlines stand alone in the red ground of the field; several star-filled octagons and smaller stars complement the design. The field is surrounded by a frieze of white serrated forms decorated with spirals, and the same motifs, drawn in alternating colours, constitute the design of the yellow-ground main border. This distinctive motif links the design of our example to the comparative pieces listed below; although these differ in field design, they were probably made in the same region. – The consignor’s grandfather was the captain of a German merchant ship who purchased the rug in Istanbul ca. 1900. Its condition at the time was the same as it is now. Obvious signs of age and wear, old repairs and repiled areas in the border section. Uniformly low pile. The upper and lower finishes have been reduced and secured with cord.Size 128 x 167 cm

Literature:
ALEXANDER, CHRISTOPHER, A Foreshadowing of 21st Century Art. The Color and Geometry of Very Early Turkish Carpets. Berkeley 1993, p. 191 *** SPUHLER, FRIEDRICH, Die Orientteppiche im Museum für Islamische Kunst Berlin. Munich 1987, no. 60 *** DUMAS, HILLARY, Trefoil. Guls, Stars & Gardens. An Exhibition of Early Oriental Carpets. Oakland, CA 1990, no. XVII *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 66, 20/05/2006, lot 151

SOLD

Kazak Rug

Caucasian Rug

19th Century 
63 × 108 cm
Stock No

SOLD

Prayer Ghiordes Rug

Anatolian Ghiordes Rug

19th Century 
145 × 220 cm
Stock No:

Gendje Rug

Caucasian Gendje Rug

19th Century 
115 × 275 cm
Stock No :

 
Bergama Rug

West Anatolian Bergama Rug 

18th Century 
175 × 180 cm
SOLD

Chine Pao Tao Rug

Nord East Suiyuan Province Chine Pao Tao Rug

19th Century 
135 × 200 cm
Stock No

 

Caucasian Rug

Caucasian Rug

18th Century 
160 × 245 cm
Stock No

West Anatolia Transylvanian Niche Carpet

Second half 17th century West Anatolia, Manisa province Transylvanian Niche Carpet

Carpets of this kind were produced in weaving centres in the West Anatolian province of Manisa, chiefly for export to Europe. The largest number of them has survived in the Protestant churches of Transylvania, resulting in the whole group being summarily described as “Transylvanian” rugs. Part of the Kingdom of Hungary, the principality was situated at one of the interfaces of the Islamic and Christian worlds at the time, and local merchants played an important role in the transit trade with the Ottoman Empire. – This beautiful red-ground example displays a double niche design, a blue diamond-shaped central medallion decorated with white rosettes along its sides and a white-ground main border of large cartouches; it compares well with two examples published by Ionescu in Weidenbach (cat. 119) and Schässburg (cat. 121). More finely woven than other examples, it has a soft texture, a nuanced palette and meticulously drawn details. – The original finishes have survived all around.Size 125 x 182 cm 

SOLD

 
Koum-Kapı Silk Rug

İSTANBUL Koum Kapı Silk Rug

19th Century 
125 × 182 cm
Stock No

Ottoman Velvet

Ottoman Silk Velvet

17th Century 
150 × 185 cm
Stock No

Star Kazak Rug

Caucasian Star Kazak Rug

18th Century 
185 × 220 cm
SOLD

Ghiordes Rug

Anatolian Ghiordes Rug

18th Century 
135 × 180 cm
SOLD

Central Asia, East Turkestan Khotan Rug

19th Century Central Asia, East Turkestan Khotan Rug

The "five flower" design, with yellow stems and rosettes in diverse colours, adorns the red field in a composition conceived in mirror image around the central vertical axis. The border shows swastika motifs within rectangular compartments. An early reference piece. – Obvious signs of age and wear, low pile.Size 94 x 150 cm 

SOLD

Karagasli Rug

Karagasli Rug 
Shirvan
3th Half 19th Century

Good Condition

101 × 155 cm
SOLD

Anatolia Aksaray Kilim

Aksaray Kilim
Anatolia
19th Century 1th quarter
Flatweave

Good Condition

150 × 262 cm
Stock No 1026

Central Anatolia Mudjur Prayer Rug

Late 18th Century Central Anatolia Mujur Prayer Rug

Niche design Mujur carpets were highly popular during the 19th century, selling to all the regions of the Islamic world. They are often very realistically portrayed in genre paintings by Western orientalist painters depicting scenes from North African bazaars. Early examples such as this red-ground Mujur display a widely conceived mihrab form and stand out due to their balanced compositions and rich range of brilliant colours. The field and border motifs were rigidly fixed by tradition, but there was a certain latitude in the design of the field. This piece shows a striking tree motif which dominates the centre of the field; linked to its tip by fine lines, it is effectively suspended from it.Very good overall condition and strong unfaded colours.Size 135 x 180 cm 

Literature:
CONCARO, EDOARDO & LEVI, ALBERTO, Sovrani Tappeti. Il tappeto orientale dal XV al XIX seculo. Milan 1999, no. 36
THOMPSON, JON, Carpet Magic. The art of carpets from the tents, cottages and workshops of Asia. London 1983, pl. p. 4 *** TKF-WIEN (publ.), Antike anatolische Teppiche aus österreichischem Besitz. Vienna 1983, no. 49 *** BUTTERWECK, GEORG & ORASCH, DIETER

SOLD

İstanbul Silk Rug

İstanbul Silk Rug

Hand-Knotted Silk Rarpet

19th Century 1th quarter
125 × 190 cm
Stock No

 

Central Asia, South West Uzbekistan Kermina Suzani

Early 19th Century Central Asia, South West Uzbekistan Kermina Suzani

Kermina was an important centre of suzani production. Situated some 110 kilometres north east of Bokhara on the Zarafshan river, the city housed the summer residence of the emirs of Bokhara. This may explain why Bokhara and Kermina suzanis share many common features in terms of design, palette and embroidery technique. – Finely embroidered in ilmoq chain stitch throughout, elegantly drawn and with an ambiguous composition, this suzani is a masterpiece of Central Asian textile art. We attribute it to Kermina for stylistic reasons. Confusing at a first glance, the repeat in the field consists of two design units repeated regularly and loosely interlocked. The offset arrangement of the design units produces a complex overall picture. Twelve diamonds of different sizes, each enclosing a red circular blossom, are arranged in diagonal bands. They alternate with a second design layer of larger cruciform devices composed of a central red blossom and four surrounding red-and-blue blossoms, also arranged in diagonal rows. Four slender green leaves emanate from the centres of the cruciform floral clusters in lively diagonal curves, adding movement to the overall design. The leaves could also be viewed as outlines of larger diamonds which, combined with the smaller diamonds, allow an alternative reading of the composition in the vertical direction. In the absence of a secondary border, the wide border immediately adjoins the field, its static calm offering a counterpoint to the dynamic movement of the field. The latter contains a diamond lattice of green straight-lined leaves enclosing 21 large red fan-shaped blossoms as the primary motifs, accompanied by smaller blossoms in red and blue. A further example of this rare group was published by Fling. – Very good condition. Mounted onto canvas.Size 170 x 220 cm 

Literature:
FLING, RUSSELL S., Khans, Nomads & Needlework. Suzanis and Embroideries of Central Asia. Columbus, Ohio 2012, Nr. 7

SOLD